Stanford Researchers Present Manganese-Hydrogen Battery as Candidate for Grid Energy Storage

Wind generation devices and solar panels are now producing an excess of energy that is not always being used. Now people are looking for a battery type system to plug the game. In particular, lithium ion batteries have been receiving a lot of attention because they can be recharged and also have the highest number of features. However, some people point out that using lithium batteries can be quite costly as they wear out and often must be replaced,

Key Takeaways:

  • Sudden power surpluses and shortages are often created due to the intermittency of renewable energies like solar and wind.
  • One current disadvantage of lithium-ion batteries is due to their cost and the fact that they lose their charge over time.
  • The manganese-hydrogen battery works by dissolving a salt in water and would solve the problem of cost and lifespan.

“The market interest in high-capacity, safe, and low-cost energy storage has picked up as the increasing deployment of solar and wind generation produces surplus electricity that cannot be immediately consumed. Recently, researchers at Stanford University in the US state of California have successfully devised a rechargeable, water-based battery that has the potential to store vast amounts of electricity cheaply and safely.”

Read more: https://www.energytrend.com/news/20180515-12297.html

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